To experience life in kairos, not just chronos

Nonessentialists tend to be so preoccupied with past successes and failures, as well as future challenges and opportunities, that they miss the present moment. They become distracted. Unfocused. They aren’t really there. The way of the Essentialist is to tune into the present. To experience life in kairos, not just chronos. To focus on the things that are truly important—not yesterday or tomorrow, but right now.

Very good book.

Greg Mckeown – Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

New quarter, new month, new life

Starting from today I have not any major customer to work for. What to do now?

I decided to take a break, look at my last 12 months and plan the next ones. Planning will involve what is important to me, not only my professional life. I have plenty of books to read, movies to watch, documents to organize, bank accounts and investments to check, wardrobe to update and more. All the stuff You don’t have time to look after. Plus I have myself to take care: more exercise, more sleep, more walking, more caring.

Last but least: friends and relationships. I know I have to work hard on that, I lost contact with too many beloved people and I regreat that. I will try to figure out how to spend more time with the people who deserve it.

Keep in touch and… have a happy life!

If nothing matters, there’s nothing to save

Her grandma tells him a very deep anecdote from the end of World War II, trying to escape a nazi camp:

A farmer, a Russian, God bless him, he saw my condition, and he went into his house and came out with a piece of meat for me.” “He saved your life.” “I didn’t eat it.” “You didn’t eat it?” “It was pork. I wouldn’t eat pork.” “Why?” “What do you mean why?” “What, because it wasn’t kosher?” “Of course.” “But not even to save your life?” “If nothing matters, there’s nothing to save.”

Jonathan Safran Foer – Eating animals

Few of us are remotely normal sexually

In truth, however, few of us are remotely normal sexually. We are almost all haunted by guilt and neuroses, by phobias and disruptive desires, by indifference and disgust. None of us approaches sex as we are meant to, with the cheerful, sporting, non-obsessive, constant, well-adjusted outlook that we torture ourselves by believing that other people are endowed with. We are universally deviant – but only in relation to some highly distorted ideals of normality.

This book puts sex in the right perspective. Recommended reading.

Alain de Botton – How to think more about sex