Support #IJF14, 24 days left

ijf14

24 days left to support Your International Journalism Festival 2014 crowdfunding initiative. You can donate 10 euro or more. More than 500 people did it.

The festival is the largest media event in Europe. It is an open invitation to listen to, learn from and network with the best of world journalism. Informality and accessibility are its key features. The festival is free entry for all attendees for all sessions.

It’s your time.

#IJF14 Project

Dig down in time

This legend [grav deg ned I tide] on my t-shirt is really quite nice. It’s from the Norwegian journalist association SKUP and it says, dig down in time. It’s a reference to the snowfalls in Norway — that if you’re up in the mountains and there’s a lot of snow, you’ve got to dig down in time to be safe but for investigative journalism this is dig down deep into the archives to understand

by Julian Paul Assange

via Sun, 25 Jul 2010 18:00:02 -0400 | WesPac | Securing America Community.

media140 in perugia… coming soon!

See You in Perugia in two weeks time? I’ll be there!

Media140 is hosting an event at the International Journalism Festival in Perugia on the 23rd April 2010, exploring the impact of real-time social media on journalism and broadcasting. Key themes will be: how will journalism respond to the changing demands of audiences? What are the changing roles of journalists: filtering, curation and verification of sources? What are the practical skills and tools which will form the foundation for journalism in the future?

via Media140 Perugia.

Wikipedia and television

So if you take Wikipedia as a kind of unit, all of Wikipedia, the whole project–every page, every edit, every talk page, every line of code, in every language that Wikipedia exists in–that represents something like the cumulation of 100 million hours of human thought. I worked this out with Martin Wattenberg at IBM; it’s a back-of-the-envelope calculation, but it’s the right order of magnitude, about 100 million hours of thought.

And television watching? Two hundred billion hours, in the U.S. alone, every year. Put another way, now that we have a unit, that’s 2,000 Wikipedia projects a year spent watching television. Or put still another way, in the U.S., we spend 100 million hours every weekend, just watching the ads. This is a pretty big surplus. People asking, “Where do they find the time?” when they’re looking at things like Wikipedia don’t understand how tiny that entire project is, as a carve-out of this asset that’s finally being dragged into what Tim calls an architecture of participation.

via Gin, Television, and Social Surplus – Here Comes Everybody.