Planning fallacy

One of the best book I read during 2014:

Have you ever underestimated how long a task will take? If you have, you are far from alone. The term for this very common phenomenon is the “planning fallacy.”6 This term, coined by Daniel Kahneman in 1979, refers to people’s tendency to underestimate how long a task will take, even when they have actually done the task before. Whatever the reasons, the result is that we tend to be later than we say we will be: later to meetings, later to deliver things at work, later in paying our bills, and so on. Thus execution becomes frustrating when it could have been frictionless. One way to protect against this is simply to add a 50 percent buffer to the amount of time we estimate it will take to complete a task or project (if 50 percent seems overly generous, consider how frequently things actually do take us 50 percent longer than expected). So if you have an hour set aside for a conference call, block off an additional thirty minutes.

Greg McKeown – Essentialism

How to be vegan

On my way to become vegetarian:

There are no merit badges for being the most vegan person in the room, no secret handshakes for people who’ve been vegan the longest. Trying out this lifestyle is an opportunity to think about our daily choices in a new, exciting way, not a route to personal perfection.

Elizabeth Castoria – How to be vegan

Salt, sugar and fat: Healthy reading for healthy eating

Talking about processed food

They are cheap. They are interchangeable. They are huge, powerful forces of nature in unnatural food. And yet, for us, knowing all this can be empowering. You can walk through the grocery store and, while the brightly colored packaging and empty promises are still mesmerizing, you can see the products for what they are. You can also see everything that goes on behind the image they project on the shelf: the formulas, the psychology, and the marketing that compels us to toss them into the cart. They may have salt, sugar, and fat on their side, but we, ultimately, have the power to make choices. After all, we decide what to buy. We decide how much to eat

From Salt, sugar and fat, one of the best book I read in 2014.

A conversation with Russ Grandinetti, VP Kindle Content for Amazon

russ grandinetti

Saturday May 3rd I had the pleasure to interview Russ Grandinetti, VP Kindle Content for Amazon. He is the guy in charge of everything related to Kindle except from hardware and devices.

We talked about new e-ink devices coming soon during next months, social reading, self publishing and more. It is one hour conversation in English from the International Journalism Festival 2014 #ijf14.

Enjoy!

Photo credit: Alessio Jacona.