Are you juggling several projects simultaneously? Then you are a ‘slasher’ (/). The term was coined by the New York author Marci Alboher and describes a growing number of people who cannot give a single answer to the question ‘And what do you do for a living?’ Suppose you are a teacher/musician/web designer.

I am a slasher (consultant/author/journalist/coach)

From The productivity project

Locke is written and directed by Steven Knight, and I give him great credit. Yet I’m not sure this is what is commonly meant by the film of a director, or auteur. Its authorship and ownership owe so much to Hardy (it was the film that established him, beyond Bronson or The Dark Knight Rises, as a major figure), but it also springs from the technology of automobiles, recording instruments, and the subsequent solitude. No film I’ve seen in recent years is more eloquent on where we are now, and on how alone we feel. There is little left but to watch and listen. A great change has occurred: once masses watched a movie together; but by now we have only our screens as company.

First, I highly recommend to watch Locke.

Second, I agree with the last quote.

From: How to watch a movie.

Nonessentialists tend to be so preoccupied with past successes and failures, as well as future challenges and opportunities, that they miss the present moment. They become distracted. Unfocused. They aren’t really there. The way of the Essentialist is to tune into the present. To experience life in kairos, not just chronos. To focus on the things that are truly important—not yesterday or tomorrow, but right now.

Very good book.

Greg Mckeown – Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

We assess race, gender, and age in a fraction of a second. We aren’t as good at guessing sexual orientation, but, to the extent we see it, we see it right away: when students are shown a photo of a man and asked if he is gay, they are about as accurate within one hundred milliseconds as they are after longer periods.16 For these reactions, we don’t need anything close to two seconds. But for other questions, two seconds isn’t nearly long enough. If we are asked to tell whether someone is friendly or dangerous, we do better with more time. To accurately assess whether someone is sociable, we need at least a minute, preferably five.17 The same is true if we are judging complex aspects of personality, such as neuroticism or open-mindedness.18 For these decisions, our impressions during the first two seconds fail us. We need more time.

Frank Partnoy – Wait: The Art and Science of Delay

Cognitive psychologists have provided mountains of evidence over the last twenty years that memory is unreliable. And to make matters worse, we show staggering overconfidence in many recollections that are false. It’s not just that we remember things wrongly (which would be bad enough), but we don’t even know we’re remembering them wrongly, doggedly insisting that the inaccuracies are in fact true.

Daniel J. Levitin – The Organized mind

Her grandma tells him a very deep anecdote from the end of World War II, trying to escape a nazi camp:

A farmer, a Russian, God bless him, he saw my condition, and he went into his house and came out with a piece of meat for me.” “He saved your life.” “I didn’t eat it.” “You didn’t eat it?” “It was pork. I wouldn’t eat pork.” “Why?” “What do you mean why?” “What, because it wasn’t kosher?” “Of course.” “But not even to save your life?” “If nothing matters, there’s nothing to save.”

Jonathan Safran Foer – Eating animals

In truth, however, few of us are remotely normal sexually. We are almost all haunted by guilt and neuroses, by phobias and disruptive desires, by indifference and disgust. None of us approaches sex as we are meant to, with the cheerful, sporting, non-obsessive, constant, well-adjusted outlook that we torture ourselves by believing that other people are endowed with. We are universally deviant – but only in relation to some highly distorted ideals of normality.

This book puts sex in the right perspective. Recommended reading.

Alain de Botton – How to think more about sex

We tend to think of money as a way of stopping time: As psychologist Ernest Becker argued in his classic text The Denial of Death, our bank accounts are emotional stand-ins for survival. We accumulate money as a substitute for being able to accumulate time. The time we have left is always an unknown; the money we have left is quite certain.

Douglas Rushkoff – Present shock